Hybrid working in North Wales

Hybrid working in North Wales

Acas, the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service has published guidance to assist employers who are considering whether hybrid working could be an viable option for their workplace and, if so, how to introduce it fairly. Many businesses in Flintshire and North Wales have approached us for advice on how to implement hybrid working measures. And also, how to remain without them. It’s not a simple process to implement hybrid working as it looks. I set out in this article some of the pro’s and con’s which the world of work may face over the next decade. In North Wales, we have range of small to very large businesses, with a vast variety of roles. Therefore, there isn’t a one size fits all policy for Hybrid working here in North Wales. Every workplace and job role are unique. As is usual for HR processes, expertise is required to get it right without causing further problems such as grievances for those that feel they have not been fairly considered. Will hybrid working suit us? It’s fair to say, hybrid working will work, and work easier in some organisations and roles than others. Therefore, if you’re a manager in an organisation and your employees and stakeholders are pressuring you to follow suit with the new normal, do take a moment and conduct your due diligence and research before you act. E.g. can your suppliers of IT, telecommunications support you? Have you got a solid employee assistance programme that can spot and deal with signs of stress remotely. Consider is it really best for your business and employees alike? The answer is, nobody knows. We can’t predict the future, we can only make a educated guess. Hybrid Working Hybrid working is one type of flexible working. Staff divide their time between working remotely, possibly from home, and in their employer’s workplace. The Welsh Government have recently said they would like to see 30% of employees working at, or close to home. Although businesses in city centres may have been disadvantaged, local ones certainly were not. The key to success will be

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Essential HR Updates – 13th September 2021

Essential HR Updates - 13th September 2021

Job Retention Scheme (JRS) On the 30th September, the Job Retention Scheme (JRS) is due to end. There has been a reduction in the overall number of collective redundancies. However, it is thought that we will see an increase in unfair dismissal claims as furlough schemes come to end. For advice on how to act correctly if you have concerns, and will potentially face issues regards this, contact us for more information asap. Judicial review into mandatory vaccinations in care homes There has been progress on the judicial review into mandatory vaccinations in care homes. The key challenges which are being argued are that the new laws go against existing ones; interfere with the right to bodily autonomy; indirectly discriminate on the grounds of race and sex; are irrational since they do not reduce transmission rates; breach the duty of sufficient inquiry since they didn’t consider the impact it would have on care homes, as well as the efficacy of alternatives (e.g. regular testing, PPE etc.); and breaches the duty to consult. Automatic unfair dismissal A recent EAT case (Simoes v De Sese UK Ltd) found that a dismissal was automatically unfair after a worker, Simoes, refused to cover a colleagues holidays, as doing doing so would mean working for 14 consecutive days, therefore breaching Working Time Regulations. Should you need information on dismissal proceedings, we’re here to help. Scotland’s four-day week The Government in Scotland have recently announced it’s proposal for a 4-day working week. At present, they have not given a start date for it, however some businesses have signed up to a trial. The Upac Group is one such company.

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Employers’ Initiative on Domestic Abuse

Employers' Initiative on Domestic Abuse

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has recently joined the Employers’ Initiative on Domestic Abuse (EIDA) as a Beacon member and called on more organisations to follow suit. EIDA Beacon’s increase the support for their employees, who may have been victims, or be at risk of domestic abuse. Resources and advice are available, as well as an heightened awareness amongst managers and staff of the signs of domestic abuse. The BEIS have highlighted in their recent report “Workplace support for victims of domestic abuse”, that few organisations have been aware of the signs of domestic abuse. Worrying, it mentions that an even smaller number have a clear policy in place to support employees. Business Minister Paul Scully said: “For anyone experiencing or at risk from domestic abuse, I want to make sure help and support is readily available to them in the workplace. No one should have to suffer in silence, and that’s why my Department is joining the EIDA to ensure employees get the support they need. Joining is a quick and free step employers can take towards furthering their support for victims of domestic abuse, Mr. Scully said. For more information, visit EIDA’s website. Recommendations for Employers’ Initiative on Domestic Abuse SUSAN BRIGHT, GLOBAL MANAGING PARTNER FOR DIVERSITY & INCLUSION AND RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS Hogan Lovells is proud to have become a founding Beacon of the Employers’ Initiative on Domestic Abuse (EIDA). The firm’s award-winning pro bono practice is exploring innovative ways to provide legal advice to support EIDA throughout 2021, from advising on contracts to contributing to an updated Toolkit for Employers to help those affected by domestic abuse. “We felt that it was critical to become a Beacon, because domestic abuse is an issue that Hogan Lovells firmly stands against. We want to partner with other organisations and share best practice about how, in the workplace, to shine a light on domestic abuse, which is why the EIDA network is so important in bringing businesses together. Becoming an EIDA Beacon builds on our long-standing commitment to helping people affected by domestic

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Employing Foreign Nationals

Employing Foreign Nationals

Employing Foreign Nationals. Hiring someone from outside the UK? A criminal offence will be committed where a business employs an individual, and they have a reasonable cause to believe that they do not have the right to work in the UK. You could be fined up to £20,000 if you do not check this. Businesses have a legal duty to prevent illegal working, and can be subjected to penalties if they fail to comply. So if you have compliance concerns with regards foreign nationals, this post will provide you with answers and official go to links for you to use. Employing Foreign Nationals – Brexit On 31 January 2020, the UK officially left the EU as a result of the 2016 Brexit vote. Therefore new immigration laws came into force from January 1st 2021. The Freedom of movement between between the UK and the EU ended. As a result of this, your HR and compliance requirements have changed. Ensure you understand and implement the new employment law immediately, so you don’t get caught out and risk the £20,000 fine. Employment rights remain the same post Brexit, except some changes to: Employing EU citizens. Employer insolvency for UK employees working in the EU. Membership of European Works Councils. In this document we will look more closely at employing foreign nationals, EU citizens and Hiring someone from outside the UK, so you feel confident in applying the process and the new law. Points-based system Immigration System A points-based immigration system is now in place. This means: you’ll need a sponsor licence to hire most employees and workers from outside the UK. anyone you recruit from outside the UK will need to meet certain criteria. Recommendation – You will need to plan ahead if you want to offer a job to someone from the EU, as it is expected to take longer than previously. You will also need separate sponsorship licenses for each prospective employee so we advise medium term recruitment plans are used if you plan to recruit from outside the UK. Prospective employees from the below categories do not need

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Paid time off for the Covid vaccine?

Paid time off for the Covid vaccine?

Paid time off for the Covid vaccine? Unsure what decision to make? Speak to an HR expert at the Hive Collaborative today. ACAS have found that a quarter of British employers have not been giving their staff paid time off for Covid-19 vaccinations. Furthermore, they have no intention of doing so going forward. Is this the correct HR decision? Back to normality? At what time will Covid-19 rules and regulations fall into the same criteria as say getting a flu jab? At which point an employer should be reasonably allowed to ask staff to use their own time to get a Covid jab? The answer might be, when the pandemic ends. The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic on March 11, 2020. After 17 grueling and chaotic months, weary people are wondering: When will the pandemic finally end? “Even among the scientific community, you would get really different answers,” says Rachael Piltch-Loeb, a researcher and fellow with the Emergency Preparedness Research, Evaluation & Practice Program at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “There is no one definition of what the end of a pandemic means.” Source: National Geographic. Further ACAS Report Recommendations Furthermore, a similar percentage are refusing to provide full company sick pay to staff who are off work sick due to vaccine side effects. On a positive note, the arbitration service found that 59% have been giving staff paid time off. 4% have not been doing, but plan to do so going forward. ACAS advise that employers should support staff to get the vaccine when it is offered. It is said that this support could include paying employees for time off for the Covid-19 vaccines, side-effects or illness associated with contracting the virus. Acas Chief Executive Susan Clews said: “It’s in businesses best interests to have a vaccine policy that supports staff to take time off as fully vaccinated workers are less likely to need longer periods of time off work to recover from Covid-19.” ACAS conclude by saying, paid time off should be given to staff to obtain the vaccination. This could be at the company

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Starting Salaries Increase report

Starting Salaries Increase report

Starting salaries increase at a quick pace, for permanent staff, due to a rising demand for staff and a further substantial drop in candidate supply. This is according to KPMG, and the REC (Recruitment and Employment Confederation) latest UK report on Jobs. Starting Salaries Increase Report The report highlights, the rate of salary inflation is the sharpest seen in almost 24 years of data collection. The availability of candidates continued to decline rapidly in July 2021, driven by concerns regarding job security due to the pandemic, a lack of European workers due to Brexit and a generally low UK unemployment rate. For employers, we are seeing they are desperate to find good candidates for the many jobs on offer, and this is clearly and directly reflected in the starting salaries increase report. I foresee many employees will likely be motivated by this and on the lookout for opportunities with new employers. Employee Turnover Cost Employee turnover is part of the employee life-cycle and business in general. Whilst it’s healthy to bring new talent into your business, losing some of your best people can be very damaging to the business and remaining workforce. This, with the added starting salaries increase will present businesses with challenges from now and throughout the rest of the year. Nurture Employees HR departments should as ever, continue to nurture employees. Check your figures. Do you have a previously high staff turnover level? If so, it’s going to be very important that you act with professionalism and urgency now to stop this statistic developing. Reasons may include; lack of appreciation, career growth or engagement, burn out, no flexible working options. Understand why people leave. Even if you don’t have a high staff turnover record, it’s important to know why staff have left in the past. Do you keep records, and act on this information? E.g. leaving interview. Engage your Teams and People – Provide them with the tools for success. Develop your staff – This doesn’t have to cost a lot; e.g. talks at staff meetings. Establish a strong culture – Be clear about

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First Aid Courses Near Me?

First Aid Courses Near Me?

First Aid Courses Near Me you ask? If you are looking for a First Aid at Work or Paediatric First Aid training courses then great, you’re in the right place. We offer the full spectrum of First Aid courses across North Wales and the North West of the UK. We serve the local Welsh counties; Flintshire, Denbighshire, Conwy, Gwynedd and Wrexham. And also those in the North West of England; Cheshire, Merseyside, Lancashire and Greater Manchester. If your business is just outside of these areas we’d still welcome your call to discuss. Courses can also be delivered nationally on request. We can also deliver our First Aid courses onsite, at your base. This can be done on a 24/7 basis, to cater for those who don’t work the usual Mon-Fri 0900-1700. This option is usually the most cost effective. Tel: 01352 781965 | Email: hello@hivecollaborative.co.uk We offer the full range of industry standard first aid training courses: • First Aid at Work. This is the most advanced and comprehensive First Aid at Work training course available. It provides delegates with toolbox of practical skills needed by first aiders, who may be required to deal with emergency situations. Delegates will complete the course and gain the ability and knowledge to deal with first aid emergencies. It meets the standards required to help comply with Health and Safety (First aid) regulations. The course is completed over a maximum of 3 days. A blended learning option is available for your convenience. • Emergency First Aid. If your organisation or workplace risk assessment identifies that your staff require first aid training then this course will help you meet your regulatory requirements. Emergency first aid at work (EFAW) training enables a first-aider to give emergency first aid to someone who is injured or becomes ill while at work. This First aid at work course covers the EFAW syllabus and also equips the first-aider with the required skills and ability to apply first aid to a range of specific injuries and illness. If you are ensure if you this course, or the full,

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Maternity Leave – Employers Guide

Maternity Leave - Employers Guide

Maternity Leave – General Overview Thanks for reading our maternity leave guide for employers. It’s equally as useful for employees who may or are planning to start a family. Pregnant employees, have the right to take up to 52 weeks’ maternity leave. This is regardless of their length of service. The pregnant employees may also qualify for up to 29 weeks’ statutory maternity pay, or a maternity allowance. The latter if they do not qualify for statutory maternity pay. At the end of the ordinary maternity leave, or during, an employee has the right to return to work to the same job and on the same terms as if she had not been absent. (See time exclusion in the key points below for normal and factory work). Time off must be allowed for pregnant employees to attend ante-natal appointments. As an employer, you must be aware of particular health and safety obligations in respect of pregnant employees, and also to those who have recently given birth or who are breastfeeding. Contact one of our HR consultants to find out more – 01352 781965. FREE H&S and HR email update service For more essential articles like this, direct to your inbox, please sign up to our FREE H&S and HR email update service. MATERNITY LEAVE KEY POINTS All pregnant employees are entitled to 26 weeks’ ordinary maternity leave (OML) and 26 weeks’ additional maternity leave (AML), regardless of their length of service. An employee is prohibited from working in the two weeks (four weeks if she works in a factory) immediately following the birth of a child. The employment contract continues as normal during maternity leave, with the exception of pay. Employees may qualify for up to 39 weeks’ statutory maternity pay or maternity allowance. Employers may also provide a period of enhanced maternity pay. From 5 April 2020 the statutory maternity pay rate has increased to £151.97 per week from 4 April 2021. Employees may agree to do up to 10 days’ work – known as ‘Keeping in touch’ (KIT) days – during the maternity leave period without losing statutory maternity pay

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Managing Short Term Absence

Managing Short Term Absence

Managing short term absence is a very important and crucial task in good Human Resource Management. There are some essential points which must be completed to ensure a fair, legal and professional approach is used. These points must be used consistently, 100% of the time. Our 10 Steps to Managing Short Term Absence. Notification procedures – Ensure your organisation has an effective procedure to follow to call in sick. Act promptly. – On all the below points. Find out the cause and keep a record Pay (SSP correctly) and any related company sickness payments. Identify any work-related factors. Incentivise attendance – In some industries this may not be best practice. Keep in touch with those absent – Simply talk to your employees. Return to work interviews – These can be relatively informal, but documented. Be clear about what improvement is required if applicable. Consider a formal procedure if no improvement if seen. FREE H&S and HR email update service For more essential articles like this, direct to your inbox, please sign up to our FREE H&S and HR email update service. General Information Managing short term absence – If an employee is absent for seven days or more, they are required to provide their employer with a fit note from a medical practitioner. This will most likely be their GP, but could be a hospital or other doctor.  Employees can return to work before a fit note comes to an end, if they feel well enough to do so. They do not need to return to the doctor to be told that they are fit for work. If you have any concerns about the ability of employees to return to work you can ask them for permission to contact their doctor or ask them to attend an assessment with a company doctor. It might be appropriate to make adjustments to the work to allow the employee to return to work.  Need assistance in this area? If you need letters and forms to help you manage short term absence; communicate with employees regarding absence in general, fit notes

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